Hit ’em where they eat: Stealth drug fights resistant bacteria

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Researchers have been on the hunt for new drugs to combat bacterial 'superbugs.' A new report describes success using gallium, a metal that bacteria confuse for iron, which they take up as a nutrient. Gallium, however, works as a Trojan horse, disrupting bacteria's ability to multiply. In mice, gallium cured lethal lung infections, and in a small test in humans with cystic fibrosis, gallium improved patients' lung function.

Unlocking the secret of how the brain encodes speech

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People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain controls speech in a similar way to how it controls arm movements.

A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin

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Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, called an organic electrochemical transistor -- a type of electronic device that can be used to measure a variety of biological functions -- into a flexible organic solar cell. Using it, they were then able to measure the heartbeats of rats and humans under bright light conditions.